Civil War Service
East Lyme, Connecticut
Nurses
Patients in Ward K, Armory Square Hospital, Washington, DC
Patients in Ward K, Armory Square Hospital, Washington, DC

   The majority of nurses who served during the Civil War were from middle class families, well-educated, generally in their 30s or 40s, and often descendants of Revolutionary War veterans. Nursing offered women a way to show their support for the war. Most were volunteers, or members of aid societies, although some followed husbands, fathers, or sons. These women experienced first hand the realities of war, and their efforts to provide aid and comfort to the soldiers was invaluable.

Last Name First Name Date of Death Cemetery
Ames Anne E. Gorton 4/3/1890 Union
Niles Mary E. Gorton 12/26/1888 Union
Navy
Sailors on the deck of the USS Monitor, James River, VA
Sailors on the deck of the USS Monitor, James River, VA

   The US Navy consisted of 1000 officers and 7500 men when the Civil War began. By 1864, there were 6000 officers and 45000 men. Vessels were purchased and rushed into service, blockading Confederate ports, while construction began on warships.  Supplies and transportation were major issues for the Navy, so support vessels were needed as well.

Ship Rank Last Name First Name Enlisted Mustered Out Date of Death Cemetery
    Gates John       Riverhead
  1st Class Boy Hobron John 3/12/1862 5/4/1865 4/16/1929 Union
    Noble Edward T.     2/18/1869 Union
    Phelps John       Riverhead
    Rogers James M.        
USS Pursuit   Wood William     2/28/1880 Union
United States Regular Army
Regiment Unit Rank Last Name First Name Date of Death Cemetery
3rd US Artillery   Musician Wight David 12/3/1906 Union
3rd US Artillery I   Hall Frederick H. 7/2/1865 Union